May 25, 2019 - Blog, Books I Read    No Comments

Cabinet of Curiosities

A Historical to Modern-Day Detective Horror

by Douglas Preston & Lincoln Child

Okaaaay… I picked this book up immediately after reading “Osiris Ritual” and was mystified why they were so much alike. The technique the killer uses is so similar it made me wonder if this criminal actually existed. The books are nothing alike, otherwise.

Douglas Preston and Lincoln Child have created a 640 page detective chase for a man who appears to have succeeded in living far beyond his years – but at such a cost, you may want to put the book down. Horrific scenes prompted me to reach for the channel changer more than once. If only these writer’s didn’t depict things so clearly!

I was happy to see the many characters were easy to keep apart, and to relate to them even if I didn’t like their personalities (villains come in all degrees, shapes and sizes). One of the main characters is a detective who has a series written by the two author’s, though I didn’t know about him until after reading this book. I will probably read more of their work, though after I’ve had time to forget the crime scenes. *shudder*

Originally posted 2013-02-24 21:56:34. Republished by Blog Post Promoter

May 24, 2019 - Blog, Books I Read    No Comments

The Crowded Grave

Death in the French Countryside

by Martin Walker

Martin Walker does not disappoint his followers with this, the fourth book about Bruno, the small-town Chief of Police who cooks (extravagant dishes), is open to new experiences (learns to ride a horse), is a quick thinker on his feet (always saving someone), and great in bed (but we already knew that:)

A recently dead body is found in an archaeological dig in the midst of a Green Party vs traditionalists fois gras protest. The Crowded Grave embraces spy’s, secrets and Sauternes, just the way I like it.

Originally posted 2012-12-10 00:36:43. Republished by Blog Post Promoter

May 24, 2019 - Blog, Books I Read    No Comments

The Dark Vineyard

Intrigue in Wine Country

by Martin Walker

I love Bruno. Bruno is the Chief of Police in St. Denis, France. Why do I love him? He’s a sweetie-pie, a great chef, he loves wine, always gets him ‘man’, and is apparently, pretty good in bed. Every novel needs a plot, and Martin Walker always serves up a huge bad guy, but frankly I love the series because of the characters… and the insider information about vineyards, French food, and history – all of which are my favourites : ) Anyone who loves France, or just a good ol’ detective novel will enjoy these books.

In this, the second in the series, we get an insight into the problems of the “little people” (in this case French wine makers of the Dordogne region) being swallowed up by big business. If it’s not done with finesse, it hurts everybody, and murder only complicates things.

Originally posted 2012-10-19 01:13:30. Republished by Blog Post Promoter

May 23, 2019 - Blog, Wine    No Comments

Really Expensive Wine

I just read a blog by Brian Clegg about

Brian Clegg a  book titled “The Billionaire’s Vinegar”. Yes, it’s about wine – very old and ancient wine.

Though not having read it, yet (it’s new on my TBR list, so it’s fairly far down), I am intrigued by the blog’s information regarding the possible fakery of such expensive sale items. Some of these bottles have apparently gone for as much as $100,000!! It would make sense that some brave entrepreneur would try to fake a few.

Billionaires Vinegar But what do you do with a $100,000 bottle of wine?

You drink it, silly! Lordy, introduce me to the guys who spend their money like that!

Now you and I both know that if wine is left out overnight, it tastes like vinegar. If the cork is tainted by TCA, the wine can be ruined, or ‘corked’.

Here’s my question to all you fabulously wealthy wine connoisseurs: How do you know the wine in that aged container is still wine and not vinegar? How do you know it’s not rebottled table wine? How do you know it will be worth the expense?

The only answer I can possibly accept is, “I’m a speculator.”glass of wine

Ahhh, the romance of a gambler who prefers a  candlelight tasting to a Vegas poker table – give me that any day. These are individuals in no need of a wash-board stomach or a tan. All they need to get my attention is to invite me for a glass!

Tense, excited, sitting in anticipating as the sommelier opens the bottle… one wonders – what will they pair with this enigma?

Originally posted 2012-02-26 16:44:34. Republished by Blog Post Promoter

Mar 31, 2019 - Blog, Books I Read    No Comments

Hotel Pastis

I have loved everyone of Peter Mayle’s works that I have read, so it was a bit of a nail-biter when it seemed this might be a depressing story. That characters weren’t getting along, deadlines weren’t being met, lives were teetering on this edge, and that. Then something amazing happened; the protagonist did what they wanted to, not what they thought they should.

It is true I normally read about murder or beyond the grave, but once in a while a glass-of-wine book is needed. This one should be at the top of the pile.

As I said on Good read:

Better than a vacation! You can smell the fabulous foods, hear the click, click, click of that woman’s heels on the marble floor, feel the tension of those thieves.. whoa, I’m getting carried away – giving it away. It’s enough to say: Peter Mayle never disappoints.

I love the characters, and wish I could be one of them.

 

 

Originally posted 2018-11-30 00:31:20. Republished by Blog Post Promoter

Feb 6, 2019 - Blog, Inspiration    No Comments

Is Inspiration Food for the Soul?

Van Gogh Sunflowers, Creative Commons

You’ve seen the photographs of Van Gogh’s paintings, right? The swirling sky, the lonely room, the sunflowers…

I’ve often wondered about that room; what would inspire a painter to use his single room habitat as his still life? To emphasize how still his life was, at the time? Or was it peaceful for a change? Did he love it, or want to share it?

But that’s it – finding one’s inspiration where it lies.

My sister gave me a plastic shopping bag with scenes of life in London on it. It’s my favourite way to shop. Yesterday my dad saw it and practically stole it from me. “You can have it back when I’m dead.”

WHA… !?

That’s the other end of it – the appreciation.

If you ask an artist why he or she painted ‘that’, they don’t say, “because I thought you’d like it.” They tell you it affected them on a deep level they can’t explain. It’s this deep level that keeps me questioning: Is that ‘place’ where our spirit is, or are we lacking a sense like smell or ESP? Is it a means of communication that only our unconscious mind can read?

The more I think about it, the less I’m sure I really want to know. When I appreciate something, I say it’s divine, heavenly… but these words bring back the thoughts of the spirit – that ‘thing’ that never dies, the part of us that galavants about the universe at night, leaving our body vulnerable and close to death, in our bed. The part of ourselves that maybe ‘lives’ forever, whatever that means. Kinda scary.

Looking at and appreciating art is, however, not creepy so I think I’ll stop the soul searching for the day, look at an art book, brush my teeth, and go dream.

Originally posted 2013-04-14 03:24:14. Republished by Blog Post Promoter

Feb 5, 2019 - Blog, Inspiration, Style    8 Comments

The Kiss

My sister was recently married in London, England and decided to have a reception in the States. We were ecstatic, and got right to work on preparations.

I was in charge of the cake.

Being that it was to be a small venue of close southern Californian friends and immediate family, I didn’t think the multi-layer cake was in order.

Since the art business is where my sister ‘calls home’, it seemed fitting that the cake should reflect that, and the romantic Gustav Klimt came to mind. His 1908 painting, “The Kiss” portrays a newly wed couple in a loving embrace of gentle affection. No other image would do.

Fondant City
I surrounded myself with coloured fondant icing – every inch of the rainbow, expanding it by making my own colours, working the dough-like frosting as if it were clay. It might have been more fun without the plastic cloves, but it was important to me that the cake be suitable for the pickiest eater. Accents of edible gold leaf pulled the image together. (The ‘glow’ around the couple is a gold leaf covered rib of fondant, as are a few areas of the garment designs in the photo detail, above.)

When the thing was presented to the newly-weds and guests, no one was willing to cut into the artwork – not even the bride and groom! Cake maker Alex Kent (aka Niki Chanel) had to do it amidst hisses and boos and gasps of disbelief… but they all had a piece.

Originally posted 2012-07-14 00:51:01. Republished by Blog Post Promoter

Feb 5, 2019 - Blog, Inspiration    No Comments

October Foods

Ok, everybody knows about the October pumpkin: pie, soup, spiced coffee, but are we forgetting the really fun foods for this time of year?

You may very well ask, “Are there any other foods that should be eaten in October besides pumpkins?”

The answer involves a little thought. The little thought is: “Does any other month contain a Halloween?”

No. October = Halloween. 

We can now expand our list of foods both in length and in waist measurement.

Let’s start with my immediate favourite – my Ghost Cookie!!! Tender gingerbread inder all that sweet icing, just like when that witch tried to eat those kids…

 

Other foods like Count Chocula breakfast (or ooooh, after midnight) cereal. Put milk in it and you get chocolate milk. Not so scary :d

Or

Frankenberry cereal. Not my favourite, but inventive.

Then there’s that movie inspiration, RATatouille. I happen to love nightshade foods like eggplant and tomatoes so this would be a treat for me. My sister gets nightmares from it, though. Strange. 

 

Ice cream (I scream) has to be on the list especially if it’s Ben & Jerry’s Devil Food Chocolate or Dastardly Mash (chocolate bits, nuts and raisins). Lots of people like Chunky Monkey, but the name always gave me “The Willies”, whatever those are…

Oh, there’s a fun B&J’s website made just for Halloween, if you’re really into the cold crypt thing. Find it at http://www.benjerry.com/halloween .

 

All this talk of edibles has given me the munchies. Uh oh, my ghost cookie is looking particularly unhappy about that!

 

 

 

 

Originally posted 2013-10-15 22:40:20. Republished by Blog Post Promoter

Feb 4, 2019 - Blog, Books I Read    No Comments

Who Do, Voodoo?

A Quick, Fast Paced, Absorbing & Fun Murder Mystery

by Rochelle Staab
If you like magic of any kind you’ll love this wonderful romp around the underworld of hexes and spells.

Author Rochelle Staab (what a great name for mystery!) weaves old movies, restaurants and key streets of Hollywood into her story to make you feel like you are in the limelight; it made me want to get in my car and go see for myself.

The story revolves around a self-sufficient, non-believing psychologist, Liz Cooper, who is swept up in the world of magical mayhem when she tries to clear her best friend Robin Bloom, of murder. It seems everyone she meets in this well rounded cast becomes involved in the deadly game of getting to the source of the danger first, before another life is lost. In the process our snarky, sexy female-lead meets up with Nick Garfield, a witty college professor and occult specialist, to get to the truth – fast! And, yes; he’s sexy, too!

This supernatural suspense is a fascinating insight into the realm of unseen forces – forces that will have you turning its pages to the unforeseeable end.

I loved it!

Originally posted 2012-03-24 15:09:26. Republished by Blog Post Promoter

Feb 4, 2019 - Blog, Books I Read    No Comments

Bruno, Chief of Police

Bruno, Chief of Police

by Martin Walker

What a delight this book was… is! The well-loved police chief of St. Denis, France is such a real character I felt I was reading fact instead of fiction. His policing techniques are bendable when it comes to the best outcome for his town and district, his friends and lovers. His talent for cooking is well known, and I have even tried some of his dishes, though don’t expect any recipes. (I had to read between the lines:) Through his eyes one can see the vistas and valleys from his house, or the trouble brewing in the market. Martin Walker has done a fabulous job, and as a writer, I envy him. Well done.

As a post script: I have to admit, I was leery, at first. The title didn’t do it, nor the cover. It was several reviews from readers that did it. So, Goodreads, take a bow.

Originally posted 2012-09-20 01:21:40. Republished by Blog Post Promoter

Pages:123»