Archive from January, 2018
Jan 26, 2018 - Blog, Books I Read    No Comments

Cabinet of Curiosities

A Historical to Modern-Day Detective Horror

by Douglas Preston & Lincoln Child

Okaaaay… I picked this book up immediately after reading “Osiris Ritual” and was mystified why they were so much alike. The technique the killer uses is so similar it made me wonder if this criminal actually existed. The books are nothing alike, otherwise.

Douglas Preston and Lincoln Child have created a 640 page detective chase for a man who appears to have succeeded in living far beyond his years – but at such a cost, you may want to put the book down. Horrific scenes prompted me to reach for the channel changer more than once. If only these writer’s didn’t depict things so clearly!

I was happy to see the many characters were easy to keep apart, and to relate to them even if I didn’t like their personalities (villains come in all degrees, shapes and sizes). One of the main characters is a detective who has a series written by the two author’s, though I didn’t know about him until after reading this book. I will probably read more of their work, though after I’ve had time to forget the crime scenes. *shudder*

Originally posted 2013-02-24 21:56:34. Republished by Blog Post Promoter

Jan 26, 2018 - Blog, Spooky Stuff    No Comments

Too Much Dr. Jekyll

When things go wrong, I resort to art.

I know this about myself, so there’s no need to report me to the Strict People – it’s nothing new. Like many other ‘Artistics’ we are taught by parents and teachers to be like the mainstream, take a deep breath and conform, but that just doesn’t work for me. Artists can only take so much before they need to be creative.

“Or what?” you ask.

1931 movie poster of Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde

That’s a complicated question, possibly without an answer.  But let’s analyze it; the left side of the human brain can do the math, but for all its accuracy a staircase is a series of equidistant, linearly connected, perpendicular lines on a two dimensional plane. Right-brainer’s live in the world of sweeping spiral staircases festooned with rococo carvings dug deeply into old oak banisters. Me? I am a right-brainer and have been known to burst out into song and sketches, or simply choke on the verbatim list of details in front of an audience awaiting facts. I really do try to maintain an even strain, to be as expected, but I leak art. What would happen if I simply embraced it? You know, the age old go-with-the-flow?

Oh no, no, no; that would just be silly.

But seriously, artists are accused of being the frivolous among us – the goofballs and cuckoo-heads. Yet every medium we absorb is art: our first books, toys, clothing, eating utensils and food are all made of artistic fancifulness, like those bright orange, smiling crunchy fish that would disintegrate if put into water. In middle school we discover computer games, smartphones, blockbuster movies and F a s h i o n! We become more aware in high-school and beyond – billboards, car designs, home decor, architecture, more movies and TV, TV, TV. Everywhere you look there is art, or at least the result of it. So why do I feel ashamed for my artistic pursuits?

The little devil on my shoulder wants to know how come I think things are going badly. After all I’ve been learning code, good, wholesome left-brainer computer code. Stinker; he knows damn well I’m stumped with a programming problem. Ah! A linear-minded pursuit. No wonder! I was too close to the unhappiness to see it. I’ve been following the straight line too long.

“Now what?” you ask.

Now, draw, glue, cut, paint. Design, carve, melt, solder. Take a break, pet the cat and watch Dr. House videos – watch as he get ah-ha’s. It might be contagious. If that lil devil whispers “If you go back to the left-brain project, I’ll help you solve your puzzle”, then maybe we’ve been Dr. Jekyll too long and it’s Hyde’s turn. Artists: do art!

OK… I’ve got an art journal and coloured pencils in my lap, Dr. House is on pause, the cat’s within reach – I’m goin’ in. Don’t wait up.

That’s what.

 

 

Originally posted 2012-09-09 01:13:34. Republished by Blog Post Promoter

Jan 25, 2018 - Blog, Books I Read    No Comments

The Crowded Grave

Death in the French Countryside

by Martin Walker

Martin Walker does not disappoint his followers with this, the fourth book about Bruno, the small-town Chief of Police who cooks (extravagant dishes), is open to new experiences (learns to ride a horse), is a quick thinker on his feet (always saving someone), and great in bed (but we already knew that:)

A recently dead body is found in an archaeological dig in the midst of a Green Party vs traditionalists fois gras protest. The Crowded Grave embraces spy’s, secrets and Sauternes, just the way I like it.

Originally posted 2012-12-10 00:36:43. Republished by Blog Post Promoter

Jan 25, 2018 - Blog, Books I Read    No Comments

The Osiris Ritual

A Thick, Twisting , Multi-layered Suspense

by George Mann

For those readers with delicate stomachs, be warned. Several murder scenes are particularly gruesome. Aside from that, fans of detective adventure with a touch of supernatural, will be thrilled.

George Mann’s view of the past is a mixture of both historically correct technology, like the first automobiles, and cybernetic things that go bump in the night, rightfully scaring the crap out of us. His characters have similarities to other beloved stories from Sherlock Holmes to the Etherman of Hell Boy. Like most Steampunk tales, this one takes place in London at the end of the 1800s, and yet it is as fresh and original as any new science that must be gotten to on the shoulders of sciences that went before. I couldn’t put it down.

Best of all, the ending is ripe for a sequel!

Originally posted 2012-12-31 21:23:19. Republished by Blog Post Promoter

Jan 24, 2018 - Blog, Books I Read    No Comments

The Dark Vineyard

Intrigue in Wine Country

by Martin Walker

I love Bruno. Bruno is the Chief of Police in St. Denis, France. Why do I love him? He’s a sweetie-pie, a great chef, he loves wine, always gets him ‘man’, and is apparently, pretty good in bed. Every novel needs a plot, and Martin Walker always serves up a huge bad guy, but frankly I love the series because of the characters… and the insider information about vineyards, French food, and history – all of which are my favourites : ) Anyone who loves France, or just a good ol’ detective novel will enjoy these books.

In this, the second in the series, we get an insight into the problems of the “little people” (in this case French wine makers of the Dordogne region) being swallowed up by big business. If it’s not done with finesse, it hurts everybody, and murder only complicates things.

Originally posted 2012-10-19 01:13:30. Republished by Blog Post Promoter

Jan 24, 2018 - Blog, Wine    No Comments

Really Expensive Wine

I just read a blog by Brian Clegg about

Brian Clegg a  book titled “The Billionaire’s Vinegar”. Yes, it’s about wine – very old and ancient wine.

Though not having read it, yet (it’s new on my TBR list, so it’s fairly far down), I am intrigued by the blog’s information regarding the possible fakery of such expensive sale items. Some of these bottles have apparently gone for as much as $100,000!! It would make sense that some brave entrepreneur would try to fake a few.

Billionaires Vinegar But what do you do with a $100,000 bottle of wine?

You drink it, silly! Lordy, introduce me to the guys who spend their money like that!

Now you and I both know that if wine is left out overnight, it tastes like vinegar. If the cork is tainted by TCA, the wine can be ruined, or ‘corked’.

Here’s my question to all you fabulously wealthy wine connoisseurs: How do you know the wine in that aged container is still wine and not vinegar? How do you know it’s not rebottled table wine? How do you know it will be worth the expense?

The only answer I can possibly accept is, “I’m a speculator.”glass of wine

Ahhh, the romance of a gambler who prefers a  candlelight tasting to a Vegas poker table – give me that any day. These are individuals in no need of a wash-board stomach or a tan. All they need to get my attention is to invite me for a glass!

Tense, excited, sitting in anticipating as the sommelier opens the bottle… one wonders – what will they pair with this enigma?

Originally posted 2012-02-26 16:44:34. Republished by Blog Post Promoter

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